Research

Below are some topics and issues I have been investigating.

Preference for the Complement Clause parse vs. Relative Clause parse in the processing of English and Korean

I investigate whether the need to find a c-commanding/perspective-holding antecedent for the reflexive causes the parser to be less committed to the complement parse and to entertain the relative clause parse. We have shown that the parser sets the prediction of the subject NP as an antecedent of the reflexive when encountered with the reflexive. I am currently conducting follow-up studies to examine what factors contribute to such relative clause preference, collaborating with Dr. Keir Moulton.

With Dr. Daphna Heller and Dr. Keir Moulton, I am also investigating what structures the parser prefer when encountered with the complement clause parse vs. relative clause parse in Korean, by using Honorifics mismatch as a probe.

Furthermore, in collaboration with Dr. Keir Moulton and other colleagues at UToronto, we are examining whether the parser actively search for the antecedent of ‘him/her’ in the fronted wh-predicates.

Finally, IHRC (Internally headed relative clause) and kes-complement clauses look so alike in Korean, meaning that the embedded CP creates string ambiguity. With Dr. Keir Moulton, I examine how quickly the parser prefers access the IHRC parse when encountered with complement clause parse.

[Presentation]

Kim, N, Moulton, K, and Yoshida, M. 2020. Ambiguity Resolution in Wh-Filler Gap Dependency. Poster presented at 17th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 23th, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Evidentials in Korean

With Dr. Daphna Heller, I investigate how do humans track differences sources of information to mentalize the other by taking advantage of evidentials in Korean.

Antecedent Retrieval in Noun Phrase Ellipsis in comparison to other anaphoric elements using agreement attraction as a probe

I investigate the syntax and underlying mechanisms working behind the antecedent retrieval of Noun Phrase Ellipsis (NPE) in comparison to another anaphoric elements (Anaphoric one, Pronoun it). I show that the retrieved information associated with the antecedent crucially depends on the grammatical and morphological features of different anaphoric elements.

[Publication]

Kim, N*., Brehm, L., & Yoshida, M. (2019). The online processing of noun phrase ellipsis and mechanisms of antecedent retrieval. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 34(2), 190-213.

Kim, N* & Yoshida, M. (submitted). The reactivation of the antecedent of Pronoun it.

Kim, N* & Yoshida, M. (submitted). Remarks on NP Ellipsis: The Wh- Extraction Puzzle.

[Presentation]

Kim, N, Brehm, L, and Yoshida, M. 2018. Antecedent retrieval in ellipsis and pronominals. Poster presented at the 30th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 17th, UC Davis.

Kim, N. Agreement Attraction in NP Ellipsis. 2017. Talk given at the Chicago Area Sentence Processing Meeting, March 3rd, Chicago, IL.

Kim, N, Brehm, L, and Yoshida, M. 2016. Agreement Attraction and pronoun it. Poster presented at Linguistic Society of America (LSA), January 5th, Austin, TX.

Kim, N, Brehm, L, and Yoshida, M. 2016. Agreement Attraction in Anaphoric one vs. NP Ellipsis. Poster presented at AMLAP (Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing), September 4th, Bilbao, Spain.

Kim, N, Brehm, L, and Yoshida, M. 2016. Agreement Attraction in NP Ellipsis. Poster presented at the 29th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 3rd, Gainesville, FL.

Kim, N, Brehm, L, and Yoshida, M. 2016. NP Ellipsis and Agreement Attraction. Talk given at the Linguistic Society of America (LSA), January 9th, Washington, DC.

The online formation of Wh-Filler-Gap Dependencies (WhFGD) and how it relates to various components in memory representation

I study the way in which maintenance and retrieval work in WhFGD processing, by paying special attention to the information that is retrieved when the gap is recognized. I contend that the information being accessed reflects the extent to which the filler is maintained, where the reader is able to access fine-grained information including category information as well as a representation of both the head and the modifier at the verb.

[Publication]

Kim, N*., Brehm, L., Sturt, P., & Yoshida, M. (2020). How long can you hold the filler: maintenance and retrieval. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 35(1), 17-42.

[Presentation]

Kim, N, Brehm, L, Sturt, P, and Yoshida, M. 2019. Different Types and Qualities of Fillers: Maintenance and Retrieval. Poster to be presented at 16th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 29th, Boulder, Colorado.

Kim, N, Brehm, L, Sturt, P, and Yoshida, M. 2019. Processing of different kind of fillers: Reactivated Fillers vs. Active Fillers. Paper presented at the LSA 2019 Annual Meeting, Jan 6th, New York.

Kim, N, Brehm, L, Sturt, P, and Yoshida, M. 2018. How long can you hold the wh-filler? Poster presented at the 15th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 17th, UC Davis.

Kim, N, Brehm, L, and Yoshida, M. 2017. Retrieving the structural and lexical content of wh-fillers: an attraction effect. Poster presented at the 30th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 31st, Boston, MA.

Processing of gapping: Parallelism and grammatical constraints

This study reveals that incremental building of the Gapping structure follows from the parser’s general preference to keep the structure of the two conjuncts maximally parallel in a coordination structure as well as from grammatical restrictions on the distribution of Gapping such as the Coordination Constraint.

Standardized Curriculum Vitae for Faculty Actions

Kim, N., Carlson, K., Dickey, M., & Yoshida, M. (2020). Processing gapping: Parallelism and grammatical constraints. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 73(5), 781-798.

Processing wh-phrases; how who, how, and two whys interact with memory

I compare the maintenance profiles for adjunct why, how, who serving as
verbal objects, as well as who serving as sentential subject. The results of our offline and online experiments reveal that these wh-phrases are maintained in memory differently, in a manner predictable from the structural distance between each wh-phrase and its licensor, which governs the grammatical function and interpretation of the wh-phrase.

[Publication]

Kim, N*, Wellwood, A, and Yoshida, M. (under review). Processing different kinds of wh-phrases; how do wh-adjunct why, how, and who interact with memory?

[Presentation]

Kim, N, Wellwood, A, and Yoshida, M. 2019. Object Who is processed differently from Subject Who, Why and How. Poster to be presented at the 16th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 29th, Boulder, Colorado.

Kim, N, Wellwood, A, and Yoshida, M. 2017. Online Processing of wh-adjuncts. Poster presented at the 30th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 31st, Boston, MA.

Kim, N, and Yoshida, M. 2016. The processing of why-questions Poster presented at the Linguistic Society of America (LSA), January 9th, Washington, DC.

Kim, N, Yoshida, M, and Wellwood, A. 2015. Two whys in English. Talk given at the Semantics Workshop of the Midwest and Prairies (SWAMP). October 30st, University of Michigan, IL.

Grammatical illusions in locative constructions

This study shows that the reanalysis of argument roles and linking of                               argument roles to the syntactic structure leads to illusory licensing of ungrammatical structures in the  comprehension of locative constructions.

[Publication]

Kim, N*., Hall, K., and Yoshida, M. (2016). Grammatical Illusions in Locative constructions. Proceedings of NELS 47. 2.

[Presentation]

Kim, N, Hall, K, and Yoshida, M. 2017. Illusory Effects in Locative Constructions. Poster presented at the 30th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, March 31st, Boston, MA.

Kim, N, Hall, K, and Yoshida, M. 2016. Grammatical Illusions in Locative Constructions. Talk given at the North East Linguistic Society (NELS 47), October 15th, Amherst, MA.

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